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Not your ordinary orange tree. 

This tree taught me a big lesson in not judging something from first looks. This is not your ordinary orange tree.

After moving to a new home a couple of years ago we have figured out what several of the fruit trees in the yard are. I literally thought they were all lime trees the first year, it turns out we don’t have a single lime tree lol. We have two lemon trees, an orange tree, a fig bush, and this really weird tree with orange fruit I deemed poison. 

For real, I seriously told my children it was poison. If you pull it off the tree it smells like an orange, but the rind is a bit different looking. Once you peel it there is a very acid lemon smell. And then you taste it. And spit it out. And everyone who has tried it has the same reaction. It’s beyond bitter and not editable at all. 

It’s so acidic I’ve been afraid to use it on food. And this year I thought perhaps I would use it as a natural cleaner. The tree is right behind my children’s playhouse and is starting to approach on their space.

This season has brought us a large amount of fruit too. Which sounds great, but what do I do with it all? Once it falls from the trees it attracts rats. I worry possibly more rats than my Ninja Kitty can keep up with. So I had decided it was a thorny hassle of a tree and I was going to put on my plaid shirt, grab my ax, and chop the thing down.

I was formulating my plans to turn the tree into firewood when I happened to mention it to a neighbor. He asked me a few more questions about the tree and then said, ‘But isn’t that a bitter orange tree?’

I didn’t understand at first he was saying the type of tree it was. I was thinking ‘why yes, it is an extremely bitter and awful tree, down with it!’.

He chucked and said maybe I should google it before I make my final decision. There were things you could make from it, like a fine orange liquor. 

Hold up, I can use these oranges to make alcohol?

So off to the internet I flew to learn more about this bitter orange tree. The first blog post I stumbled upon was the Seville Orange Marmalade recipe. In this blog post by Elise Bauer, she explains how difficult it might be for someone to find bitter oranges for this awesome marmalade. It’s not something you can find at a grocery store and they are only in season during the winter months. Basically you have scored if you have a neighbor with a tree. And it turns out I’m that neighbor! If you live in Central Florida and want some, contact me soon, they are in season and you can pick them right off my tree.

The very first thing I wanted to try and make is an orange liquor. And the internet provided me with a simple and fun Orange Liqueur Recipe. We are currently 10 days in and about to do the second steps. It’s been so fun to try this out and use what is growing right in our backyard. I’ll keep you updated on a future blog post and let you know how this turns out. 

Isn’t’ it funny how sometimes we judge something completely wrong? I mean I was going to cut down a tree that is quickly becoming my favorite tree. The true value is often hidden and it’s up to us to discover. 

This was also true for cable crochet work. I wasn’t exactly happy with the way the cables looked when I was designing, but instead of throwing the whole thing out the window I took what was there and discovered a new way to use crochet cables by using the Infinity Crochet Method. I find it easier than what we were doing before with very pretty results. So why not try it out while we wait for the bitter oranges to ferment. 

Whims Crochet Earwarmer

This is an Infinity Crochet Pattern. To learn more about Infinity Crochet Cables please visit HERE.

Supplies:

• Crochet Hook 4 mm (G), I highly recommend Furls Hook (affiliate link) or a Tulip Rose Crochet Hook (link below). I love both of these.
• Yarn Needle
• Scissors
• 3×1″ Leather Strip or embellishment. 

To see how I created a custom tag visit this blog post:
Laser Engraver For Crafts

Yarn:
• DK Lightweight 3
Furls Whims Merino-
in colorway Light Grey

Yardage:
• Approx. 170  Yards [155 meters]

Gauge:
• 20 sts and 24 rows = 4” (10 cm)
in sc stitch

Many of the supplies can be found at the affiliate links below:

Measurements:
• Adult size, brim stretches
to fit 19-23” heads
• The width of band is approx. 3.75”

Abbreviations:
• blo – back loop only
• ch – chain
• FF2DC* – Front Float 2 Double Crochet
• FF2TR* – Front Float 2 Treble Crochet
• FF2DTR* – Front Float 2 Double Treble Crochet
• rep – repeat
• sc – single crochet
• sc2tog (in stitch design)
• skfs – skip floating stitches
• sl st- slip stitch
• st(s) – stitch(es)
• yo – yarn over
*See special stitches

Skill Level:
• Intermediate

Special Stitches:

FF2DC (Front Float Two Double Crochet)
Yo, insert hook from front-to back-to-front around post of indicated st (or next available floating st, if no st is indicated) and pull up a loop, [yo and draw through 2 loops] twice. Repeat for remaining floating stitch to work a total of two front float stitches next to each other.

FF2TR (Front Float Two Treble Crochet)
Yo two times, insert hook from front-to back-to-front around post of indicated st (or next available floating st, if no st is indicated) and pull up a loop, [yo and draw through 2 loops] 3 times. Repeat for remaining floating stitch to work a total of two front float stitches next to each other.

FF2DTR (Front Float Two Double Treble Crochet)
Yo three times, insert hook from front-to back-to-front around post of indicated st (or next available floating st, if no st is indicated) and pull up a loop, [yo and draw through 2 loops] 4 times. Repeat for remaining floating stitch to work a total of two front float stitches next to each other.

Notes:

Welcome to a fun new earwarmer with Infinity Crochet!
This piece is created in rows and then seamed. When joining together an accessory piece can be added to hide the seam, or mock cable stitches can be used to create an invisible seam.

The chain 1 at the beginning of the row does not count as a stitch.

Whims Merino Crochet Earwarmer Tutorial:

Infinity Cable Band:

Row

Description

Stitch Count

Float Sts

1 (WS)

With G hook, ch 15, sc in second ch from hook and across, turn.

14

0

2 (RS)

Ch 1 (The chain 1 does not count as a st), sc in each stitch across, turn.

14

0

3

Ch 1, sc in each stitch across, turn.

14

0

4

Ch 1, sc 4, *(FF2DC around stitch below on row 1, sc) twice, FF2DC around stitch below on row 1*, sc 2; repeat from * to * one time, sc last 4, turn.

14

12

5-7

Ch 1, sc in each stitch across (skipping floating sts), turn.

14

0

8

Ch 1, sc 4, skipping first six floating sts, FF2TR around next 2 floating sts, (sc, FF2TR around the next 2 floating sts) twice, sc 2, working the first set of skipped floating stitches FF2DTR, (sc, FF2DTR around next skipped floating sts) twice, sc 4, turn.

14

12

9-11

Ch 1, sc in each stitch across (skipping floating sts), turn.

14

0

12

Ch 1, sc 4, *(FF2DC around floating sts from 4 rows below, sc) three times,* sc 2; repeat from * to * one time, sc last 3, turn.

14

12

13-15

Ch 1, sc in each stitch across (skipping floating sts), turn.

14

0

16

Repeat Row 12

14

12

17-19

Ch 1, sc in each stitch across (skipping floating sts), turn.

14

0

 

Repeats:

Repeat rows 8-19 for a total of 9 pattern repeats. Then Repeat Rows 8-16 one more time. Test the band around head to see if more or less repeats are required. 

Ribbing:

Round

Description

 

Bottom Ribbing

Row

`1

This next part will be worked along one edge of the cable band.

Ch 7, sl st in 2nd chain from hook and across. Sc into the next two stitches from earwarmer edge, turn. (6 sts)

2

Skip the 2 earwarmer edge slip sts, sl st 6, turn. (6 sts)

3

Ch 1, sl st 6, sl st into the next two stitches from body edge, turn. (6 sts)

Rep

Repeat rows 2- 3 of bottom ribbing around the bottom of the body.

Joining:

To join the two ends, sc in the blo and starting edge at the same time, ignoring floating stitches. Fasten off leaving a 12 inch tail. Use tail to stitch together floating stitches to hide the seam, similar to how the Valencia Cable Sweater was joined. However, if using a leather tab, the seam will be hidden. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Finishing:

I used a custom leather tag to add an embellishment on the earmwarmer. Feel free to use whatever accessory you like best. It could be a ribbon, a jewel, or a scrap of fabric. Adding different textures together compliments the design.

Fade Two Ways Crochet Beanie

Fade Two Ways Crochet Beanie

With winter upon us it’s time to whip up a warm and cozy crochet hat. Get started with this Free Fade Two Ways crochet pattern.