Infinity Crochet Cables

A new crochet cable method exclusively developed by Briana K.

Infinity Bulky Braid Wrap

What Is Infinity Crochet Cables?

Infinity Crochet transforms the look and feel of crochet cables and the technique involved.


Is the method hard?

Not at all. If you have ever worked with crochet cables, you already have the skills to learn how to create beautiful cables with Infinity Crochet. If you are a novice to crochet cables, this is the perfect method to learn as it solves many of the previous flaws of crochet cables. Keep reading to try out this technique.

How is this cable technique different?

Unique Look That Pops

This new method has many more aspects and possibilities than a regular cable. It’s the polar opposite in concept and ability.

Customer Review

"Superb cabling and exceptionally cozy for Fall and Winter wear."

-Michelle W.

See

The Infinity Cables


Infinity Crochet Compare

Side by Side Comparison


Traditional way of working crochet cables

Infinity Crochet

Infinity Crochet Cables

Infinity Crochet

Side by Side Comparison


Traditional way of working crochet cables

Infinity Crochet

Infinity Crochet Cables

Infinity Crochet

Try Out The Infinity Symbol Swatch

Want to try out Infinity Crochet Cables? Follow the crochet instructions below to create your first swatch.

Infinity crochet symbol swatch

Notes on the Infinity Crochet Symbol Swatch

  • The chain at the beginning of the row does not count as a stitch.
  • Some rounds will increase in stitch count due to floating stitches and then decrease again on the next round.
  • If the cables pull in too much and the fabric does not lay flat, simply add one yarn over to each floating stitch.
  • If the cables are too loose, take away one yarn over from each floating stitch.

Supplies for the Infinity Crochet Symbol Swatch:

Size US H-8 (5mm) Crochet Hook
Yarn: Any Worsted Weight Yarn with minimal texture. I chose to use a cotton.
Gauge: 16 sc and 17 rows = 4″ (10 cm)
Skill Level: Intermediate

Abbreviations:

  • 4-st LC * – 4-stitch left cross
  • 4-st RC * – 4-stitch right cross
  • ch – chain
  • CC * – closing curve
  • FFDC * – front float double crochet
  • FFTR * – front float treble crochet
  • OC * – opening curve
  • sc – single crochet
  • sk3fs – skip 3 floating stitches
  • sk6fs– skip 6 floating stitches
  • st(s) – stitch(es)
  • yo – yarn over
  • * See “Special Stitches”

Special Stitches
4-st LC (4-st left cross)
This group of sts counts as 4 sc and 6 floating sts.
Worked as follows: sk3fs, FF3TR around next floating sts, sc in each of next 4 sc, working over floating sts just created FF3TR around skipped floating st.

4-st RC (4-st right cross)
This group of sts counts as 4 sc and 6 floating sts.
Worked as follows: sk3fs, FF3TR around next floating sts, sc in each of next 4 sc, working under floating sts just created FF3TR around skipped floating st.

CC (closing curve)
Completed CC counts as 1 sc and no floating sts.
Worked as follows: sk3fs, FFDC around 4th floating st stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 3rd skipped floating st stopping with 2 loops on the hook, FFDC around 5th floating st stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 2nd skipped floating st stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 6th floating st. stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 1st floating st. stopping with 2 loops on hook, insert hook into next sc and pull up a loop, yo and pull through all loops on hook.

FF3DC (front float double crochet)
Yo, insert hook from front-to back-to-front around post of first floating st (or next available floating st, if no st is indicated) and pull up a loop, [yo and draw through 2 loops] twice. Repeat steps for 2nd and 3rd floating sts

FF3TR (front float treble crochet)
Yo twice, insert hook from front-to back-to-front around post of first floating st (or next available floating st, if no st is indicated) and pull up a loop, [yo and draw through 2 loops] 3 times. Repeat steps for 2nd and 3rd floating sts

OC (opening curve)
This group of sts counts as 4 sc and 6 floating sts.
Worked as follows: Skip 2 sc, FF3TR around next sc 1 row below, sc in each of 2 skipped sc and in each of next 2 sc, FF3TR around the base of each stitch in the FF3TR just made, starting with the 3rd floating stitch. *tip, rotating your work when completing the OC is helpful

RowInstructionsSC Stitch
Count
Float Stitch
Count
1Fsc 18, turn
OR chain 19, sc in second chain from hook and across, turn
180
2Ch 1, sc in each stitch across, turn180
3Ch 1, sc 7, OC (opening curve), this group of sts counts as 4 sc and 6 floating sts.
Worked as follows: Skip 2 sc, FF3TR around next sc 1 row below, sc in each of 2 skipped sc and in each of next 2 sc, FF3TR around base of each stitch in the FF3TR just made, starting with the 3rd floating stitch, sc 7, turn
186
4Every even row will skip the floating stitches, simply leave them un-worked and continue to sc the background stitches only:
Ch 1, sc 7, sk3fs, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 7, turn
186
5Ch 1, sc 5, FF3DC, sc 8, FF3DC, sc 5, turn186
6Ch 1, sc 5, sk3fs, sc 8, sk3fs, sc 5, turn186
7Ch 1, sc 4, FF3DC, sc 10, FF3DC, sc 4, turn186
8Ch 1, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 10, sk3fs, sc 4, turn186
9Ch 1, sc 5, FF3DC, sc 8, FF3DC, sc 5, turn186
10Ch 1, sc 5, sk3fs, sc 8, sk3fs, sc 5, turn186
11Ch 1, sc 7, FF3DC, sc 4, FF3DC, sc 7, turn186
12Ch 1, sc 7, sk3fs, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 7, turn186
13Ch 1, sc 9, FF3DC twice, sc 9, turn186
14Ch 1, sc 9, sk6fs, sc 9. Turn186
15Ch 1, sc 7, 4-st LC (4-st left cross), this group of sts counts as 4 sc and 6 floating sts. Worked as follows: sk3fs, FF3TR around next floating sts, sc in each of next 4 sc, working over floating sts just created FF3TR around skipped floating st., sc 7, turn186
16Ch 1, sc 7, sk3fs, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 7, turn186
17Ch 1, sc 5, FF3DC, sc 8, FF3DC, sc 5, turn186
18Ch 1, sc 5, sk3fs, sc 8, sk3fs, sc 5, turn186
19Ch 1, sc 4, FF3DC, sc 10, FF3DC, sc 4, turn186
20Ch 1, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 10, sk3fs, sc 4, turn186
21Ch 1, sc 5, FF3DC, sc 8, FF3DC, sc 5, turn186
22Ch 1, sc 5, sk3fs, sc 8, sk3fs, sc 5, turn186
23Ch 1, sc 7, FF3DC, sc 4, FF3DC, sc 7, turn186
24Ch 1, sc 7, sk3fs, sc 4, sk3fs, sc 7, turn186
25Ch 1, sc 9, CC (closing curve), counts as 1 sc and no floating sts.,
Worked as follows: sk3fs, FFDC around 4th floating st stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around third skipped floating st stopping with 2 loops on the hook, FFDC around 5th floating st. stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around second skipped floating st stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 6th floating st. stopping with 2 loops on hook, FFDC around 1st floating st. stopping with 2 loops on hook, insert hook into next sc and pull up a loop, yo and pull through all loops on hook. Sc 8, turn
180
26Ch 1, sc in each stitch across, continue to crochet a border if desired, fasten off and weave in ends.180

Infinity Crochet Symbol Swatch Video:

Infinity Crochet Cables Interview

Back in August 2019, Kathryn Vercillo interviewed me for Happily Hooked digital magazine so that I could share more about my infinity cable technique. I’m really proud of this unique technique that allows you to learn how to create more three-dimensional crochet cables. So, today, I thought I’d share that old interview with you in full.

When and how did you learn to crochet?

Like many crafters, I originally learned to crochet from family members when I was young. I dabbled in projects here and there but wasn't really interested in it as a hobby until years later when I was pregnant with my first son. My mom was in town for the birth and I was grouchy because being 10 days overdue is not fun. To pass the time we picked up crochet hooks. She wanted to teach me a few more techniques so I could make an item for his newborn pictures. Before I could finish the item, I went into labor. My mom finished that project for me. Only a couple of weeks after his birth, my love for crochet “clicked” and I haven't put down my hook since. 

Learn more about me here.

What was your own journey into crochet design like? What have been the biggest joys and challenges?

My journey has felt natural most of the time, but it's taken a lot of dedication. My biggest challenge is accepting delays. It's so hard some days to put crochet aside and put my family first because crochet is also an escape and anxiety relief. As a special needs parent, I am so grateful for the outlet but also frustrated at times when I don't get the opportunity to pick up my hooks.  

I used to get down on myself for my workflow; it seemed while everyone else was meticulous in the way they would plan designs I’d just fly from moment to moment and jump from color to color. Most of my ideas happen when I'm just waking up in the morning or when I’m taking a shower in the evening. During those few moments of silence, ideas pop in my head randomly. I've learned to just go with it without questioning my process. Acceptance is something my 30's are teaching me well. Accepting my random and often unplanned workflow has gotten easier. Sometimes we don't need to fit inside the box because the way we are is fabulous. 

It sounds like despite the challenges, crafting has brought great things to your life. 

Crochet and knitting are things that are just mine. While it's something so many people do across the world, we each practice the craft in our own way and in our own time. I get to determine every aspect without judgment, allowing me to shut out the noise of society’s expectations. So many of us are bombarded with pressure from all angles; crafting empowers us to make our own choices. We choose to pick up the yarn and we choose what we want to make all while enjoying the creative process.

Eventually, you learned about crochet cables. What are your memories of first learning this technique?

Many crocheters find cables to be intimidating, and I was no different. However, once I did my first cable, I realized that while it looks difficult, it really is not! I loved the look BUT something was always lacking for me in comparison with the variety of knit cables I would see. 

I often translate many of my patterns back and forth between crochet and knit. I longed to mimic the knit cables but found the methods available were coming up short. Frustration set in and I just could not accept the limitations of crochet cables. I had to come up with something new.

What was it like when you first started tackling that crochet goal?

My very first swatch took too many tries to count. All I wanted to do was create a circle that was small and simple, but I knew that if I could do it, then infinity crochet cables were possible. I never wanted to give up and I was determined to see my hook work up the best possible cable crochet circle. 

Now that you’ve perfected it, what do you like about the infinity crochet cable technique?

What I love most is the possibilities of traveling cables quickly and also the flexibility to translate the design to knit. It's not a complicated process and it makes so much sense to try. My favorite phrase that I hear over and over from fans is: “Why haven't we been doing it like this from the start?”

Which is your favorite of your infinity crochet patterns and why?

Hands down the Infinity Bulky Braided Wrap.

There were some things that happened behind the scenes on this one that will help push future designs forward. I had drawn it up on graph paper using some 'rules' that I felt applied. In just minutes, I was looking at a concept I couldn't wait to try. When my theory worked out, I was so pumped. I'm considering offering a class to other designers someday to teach them the rules for easily graph drawing cables in minutes and having them work up perfectly each time. 

That would be a terrific thing to offer. What do you most hope people will take away from learning your unique approach to crochet cables?

I hope they take away pride in their work. The impressive pop of the cables is attention-grabbing and so satisfying. Cabling is not difficult, but it’s also not a beginner-level skill, so when someone completes a cable, they should be proud of themselves.

Before we wrap up, let’s talk about a few of your favorite things. What’s your favorite fiber?

If you asked my husband this question, he could absolutely answer it, because he knows by now what my favorite fiber is. I LOVE MERINO WOOL! I always gravitate towards it in either a dk or worsted weight. The fiber is just so soft and drapes so well with amazing temperature control properties. No scratchy wool over here!

My current favorite Merino Wool is Swish from WeCrochet.

How about your favorite crochet hooks?

You can see all of my favorites in my post about best crochet hooks!

What's your favorite social media platform and why?

My favorite group is the Briana K Community Group on Facebook. I love seeing the projects completed with my patterns and also many other creative projects that may not even be yarn-related. It's a place to leave behind the stress and communicate with fellow passionate crafters. When I've had a really hard day and I feel down this is the encouraging place I visit on social media.

Ready to get started? Check out my free Infinity Cable Swatch pattern. It includes a video to help you learn the technique. Or dig into one of my other infinity crochet patterns.

Well That Was Fun! What's Next?


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